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Georges Barbier (1882-1932) - Venus and Adonis (aka Phaedra and Hippolytus)

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Georges Barbier - Venus and Adonis (aka Phaedra and Hippolytus)

George Barbier (1882-1932) - né Georges Augustin Barbier, was one of the great French illustrators of the early 20th century. Born in Nantes, France on 16 October 1882, Barbier was 29 years old when he mounted his first exhibition in 1911 and was subsequently swept to the forefront of his profession with commissions to design theatre and ballet costumes, to illustrate books, and to produce haute couture fashion illustrations.

For the next 20 years Barbier led a group from the Ecole des Beaux Arts who were nicknamed by Vogue "The Knights of the Bracelet"—a tribute to their fashionable and flamboyant mannerisms and style of dress. Included in this élite circle were Bernard Boutet de Monvel and Pierre Brissaud (both of whom were Barbier's first cousins), Paul Iribe, Georges Lepape, and Charles Martin. During his career Barbier also turned his hand to jewellery, glass and wallpaper design, wrote essays and many articles for the prestigious Gazette du bon ton. In the mid-1920s he worked with Erté to design sets and costumes for the Folies Bergère and in 1929 he wrote the introduction for Erté's acclaimed exhibition and achieved mainstream popularity through his regular appearances in L'Illustration magazine.

Barbier died in 1932 at the very pinnacle of his success. He is buried in Cemetery Miséricorde, Nantes.
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scifi72

LOL. I guess the saying "There are plenty of fish in the sea." did not apply to women for him. It was actual fish. It can be a grand life but only for those who truly love it and understand it. I believe he loves it. I just did a puzzle posted by @Denyce - a beautiful 1928 movie poster. I'm sure I'll be doing more. Here's to Oz.

Audslibrary

How grand to have you scifi72 in here in this conversation. In his late teens my son explained he didn't have the income to support both fishing and a girlfriend. He is still a fisherman . . . everyday in the sea. . . fishing or snorkeling.

scifi72

Thank you, @Denyce & @Audslibrary for posting Barbier's work. I do like his style and I would like to see more. And @susie38 - your comment about hunting - apparently nothing's changed. Lot of men (and women) today love to go out hunting or fishing and may neglect their friends, families, duties, and even Venus. I too thought Adonis acted aloofly. Do people still use "aloof"?

aloof (adv.)

1530s, "to windward," from a- (1) "on" + Middle English loof "windward direction," probably from Dutch loef (Middle Dutch lof) "the weather side of a ship" (see luff (n.)). Originally in nautical orders to keep the ship's head to the wind, thus to stay clear of a lee-shore or some other quarter; hence "at a distance but within view" (1530s) and, figuratively, "apart, withdrawn, without community spirit" (with verbs stand, keep, etc.). As an adjective from c. 1600. Related: Aloofly; aloofness.

Denyce

LOL - great minds and taste**

Audslibrary

And I just now see that you've posted one today. That is actually my last and ninth upload. . . going up tomorrow. Good for those folks who don't follow either of us, and may otherwise miss that very good one. I think I saved the best for last. . . and you posted it first. How grand!

Denyce

Good to hear. I have bookmarked your other Barbiers - thank you**

Audslibrary

Oh, Denyce, that would be wonderful. You can see that he has been a big hit with our community here.

Denyce

I found your comments about this artist very interesting Audslibrary. Barbier's paintings are marvellous. If you are interested I have (and will) post daily works by this him this month**

Audslibrary

Well I said I didn't know my belief systems. . .though I did read up on the ancient Greek stories earlier this evening, of Phaedra and Hippolytus.. . and "erudite" does not appear to be an apt description of either of them.

susie38

Not erudite. I should have checked on Venus and Adonis before making that comment.. I would have learned Adonis was not interested in Venus and would rather go hunting.

Audslibrary

Thank you susie38. AND the comments are wonder, witty, amusing, erudite!

susie38

Can't pass up a Barbier and loved the puzzle. Somehow Adonis doesn't look very interested in Venus. I thought she was supposed to be irresistible.

Audslibrary

Strong Erte' in style, for sure.

eagleboi

The artist is definitely in his element here, reminds me of Erte' in style. Thank you for this puzzle.

Audslibrary

These are such a hit! I am pleased . . . thank you all for your comments. Bill, I shall look for those wallpaper designs and more. Four more of these (highlighting the four elements) will get posted as soon as I'm allowed. . .perhaps 8 hours from now?

Bill_I_Am

And devoted, too. Thanks for the tag, Mike. And thanks for the lovely puzzle, Aud. I LOL at “The Knights of the Bracelet.” I'd love to see some of Barbier's wallpaper designs.

Audslibrary

Well. . . thank you so much for saying so.
I didn't explain the story of Venus and Adonis and I don't know whether the story of Phaedra and Hippolytus is the same. You have urged me to live up to your descriptions. . . . by spending this evening brushing up on my belief systems!

scifi72

@Audslibrary, my goodness! Such a beautiful work of art - exquisite. The colors, the composition, the design, and the sexiness. Barbier was a great artist and a designer, wasn't he? And sad he died so young. Thank for sharing another gem. You are indeed a library of culture and knowledge.

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