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The Aztec Sun Stone - The National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City

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According to Wikipedia:

The Aztec or Mexica calendar is the calendrical system used by the Aztecs as well as other Pre-Columbian peoples of central Mexico. It is one of the Mesoamerican calendars, sharing the basic structure of calendars from throughout ancient Mesoamerica. The Aztec sun stone, also called the calendar stone, is on display at the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City. The calendar consists of a 365-day calendar cycle called xiuhpōhualli (year count) and a 260-day ritual cycle called tōnalpōhualli (day count). These two cycles together form a 52-year "century", sometimes called the "calendar round". The xiuhpōhualli is considered to be the agricultural calendar, since it is based on the sun, and the tōnalpōhualli is considered to be the sacred calendar.

Shortly after the Spanish conquest, the monolithic sculpture was buried in the Zócalo, the main square of Mexico City. It was rediscovered on December 17, 1790 during repairs on the Mexico City Cathedral. Following its rediscovery, the sun stone was mounted on an exterior wall of the cathedral, where it remained until 1885. Early scholars initially thought that the stone was carved in the 1470's, though modern research suggests that it was carved some time between 1502 and 1521.
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Comments

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scifi72

OOPS my typo, LOL, another edit --- You give me such *good advice....

It is good to meet you, @jerrys. You be well too.

jerrys

@scifi72 I edit entries, as well. Stay well.

scifi72

@jerrys, you give me such give advice. I do appreciate it. I usually do not like to simply cut & paste together pieces of information. I prefer to read, digest, and paraphrase into my insight and understanding. It makes the puzzle more personal. And that is what I want for myself and to offer others.

jerrys

@scifi72 No shame in using information. Just credit the source. When relying on the Wiki suite of information for posted narrative background I just usually start with "According to Wikipedia" or Wikimedia or whatever...Keep 'em coming!

GeorgiaKayaker

Thank you. That's the one I saw and had never seen your colorful version.
Richard

scifi72

You all are welcome. I cannot tell a lie - narrative is cut out of Wikimedia because I thought it deserved background info. I could not write nor paraphrase it as well as they. The basalt stone is gigantic - about 12 feet in diameter and 3 feet thick - weighing 54,210 pounds. @Mischka, this is me, Sam. The Aztec Sun Stone presented in this puzzle is a restored and colorized version. To see the original and to know its size check out the URL below for a photograph.

https://www.mexicolore.co.uk/images-aus/aus_18_02_2.jpg

jerrys

@scifi72 What a marvel! Thanks for the reminder of this highly advanced "primitive" culture. Also for the informative narrative. Stay well.

Mischka

It's so colorful! Were the materials smaller stones?

I was super interested in the Aztecs as a child, and my 12yo brother actually was given permission to attend classes in their culture at a museum downtown. I take it back, he was studying one of the other great cultures, the Incas or Mayans, but he taught me a lot. We were the kids to make parents proud - studying more than required, doing extra homework for our own amusement.

Thank you, Unnamed Man. :-D

GeorgiaKayaker

The traffic was so bad in Mexico City that I took a taxi and the hotel's tour to the many wonderful museums including this one, The tours were great because they always had and informative translator and fun people to meet.
Thanks for the puzzle and history of the calendar,
Richard

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